Thursday, February 28, 2013

Camillia Japonica vs. Sinensis

 
 
Camellia Sinensis is part of the Camellia family.
It is where tea comes from.

The two photos above are Camillia Japonica Mountain Tea.
When I saw these plants at the Lan Su Chinese Gardens in the Fall
I was fascinated that they were called Mountain Tea.
Camillia Japonica is generally a decorative plant,
which we call Camillia.
The blossom below is my first blossom just opening in my yard.
Soon I will have armloads of beautiful blossoms in reds, pinks, and white.
After a little research I did find that the Camillia Japonica Mountain Tea
has been used for developing a none caffeinated drink,
but certainly not at the delight that the Camillia Sinensis brings to us.
Aren't the berries on the Camillia Japonica beautiful?
I do believe they would be quite stunning in a Fall bouquet.
Next week I will share more of the Camillia's from my garden.
It is definitely Camillia season in Portland.

6 comments:

Jeanie said...

Aren't these beautiful! I never thought about camellia as tea, but I suppose lots of things can be. How lovely to know these blooms will soon be bursting in your world!

Mary said...

My pinky-red ones are out already and so pretty - I always try to gather up the fallen blooms because I read somewhere they cause disease to the soil around the plant......have you heard that Marilyn?

Didn't know they were making tea from them!

Mary X

Gail said...

Hi
Who knew? Beautiful pictures, I am in love
Love Gail
peace....

Angela McRae said...

A friend of mine who wanted a clipping from my camellia sinensis plant was telling me she went to a propagation class the other day and learned now is the time to plant camellias. I hope her tea plant takes root in case I ever need to get a clipping from HER one day!

Linda said...

Looking forward to seeing more of your camellias. I particularly like the pale one you've shown us.

paris parfait said...

So pretty! And it would be gorgeous in a fall bouquet; there's something similar (perhaps the European version) that florists use here.